Superman in the Fifties, 2002 Tpb

It’s no secret that I love Superman. Maybe not every iteration or every era, but I do love the character quite a bit. A big part of that love comes from two sources. First, the Superfriends TV show. I really loved the Man of Steel on the show, as he usually represented a good idea of what Siegel and Shuster tried to relay to readers back in 1938. The second source, and the most important was Christopher Reeve in Superman and Superman II. His moral code and idea that Superman is most importantly a friend to those in need is something he truly believed, and so do I.

This trade paperback really showcases some very fun content of the age, and Superman himself. At this point, Superman had more than a decade of history behind him, a radio show, cartoon (Fleischer), film serial, and a live action tv show (that was new, but a huge hit already). The popularity of the character cannot be understated, and the comic books were great, too!

Just to hit some of the highlights in here, the lead story “Three Supermen from Krypton” from Superman 65, 1950. An interesting tale that tells of three more survivors from the domed planet Krypton. Three evil beings that once challenged Jor-El himself. Written by William Woolfolk, with art by Al Plastino.

Another gem from this collection is “The Ugly Superman,” from Superman’s Girlfriend Lois Lane 8, 1959. Perry assigns Lois to cover the sports beat, and that includes a professional wresting match! Lois compliments him, and he immediately falls for her. Superman/Clark enjoys watching her squirm. Written by Robert Bernstein, art by Kurt Schaffenberger.

You can’t speak about the trade without speaking on Action Comics 252, 1959. Otto Binder and Al Plastino¬†bring us “The Supergirl from Krypton!” Clark sees a missile heading to Earth, and heads out to inspect the crash site. He can’t believe his eyes, as a girl, wearing a similar costume hops out of the missile. She tells him her amazing origin story of how she escape the doomed planet Krypton, and how she came to Earth.

Finally, I present, “The Bride of Bizarro!” Written by Otto Binder, with art by Al Plastino. What if I told you theres a story with Lois, Superman, Bizarro, and…another Superman that’s actually a Bizarro, but looks like the real Superman? We also get a wrecked pirate ship, Bizarro Clark, and Bizarro Lois. It’s one of the funniest comics I’ve ever read.

Do yourself a favor and seek out this trade. I bought it at a discount retailer for $5 (it’s a $20 retail)! An introduction by Mark Waid, cover galleries, and more awesome stories are inside this awesome book!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Giant Superman Annual 3, 1961 “The Strange Lives of Superman!”

If you haven’t figured it out by now, crazy comics bring me quite a bit of joy. Mostly Bronze Age comics that were written with a bit of intent as far as the craziness is concerned, but also insane Silver Age stories that were intended to entertain children, but by some stroke of luck or mild intent, they also amuse me to no end. One of the characters at the top of the Silver Age list is definitely Superman. Long before Christopher Reeve donned the cape and tights, and made us believe a man could fly, writers and artists were creating stories and worlds for this character that were very wild and went in every direction. This annual is just one example of the insanity.

 

There are seven magnificent stories in this book, along with several illustrations. The best of these is a schematic of the Fortress of Solitude!

The first story, “The Super-Prisoner of Amazon Island,” doesn’t (unfortunately) feature Wonder Woman, but it does show an island full of Amazon women that have captured the Man of Steel, and are intent on auctioning him off to the highest bidder. Story by Otto Binder, art by Wayne Boring and Stan Kaye.

 

Next up is “Superman’s New Face.” We see a scientist with an experiment gone awry. Superman interjects, and saves the man, but the ensuing accident scars Superman’s face badly (the explosion created tiny particles of Kryptonite). Of course he’s too embarrassed to show Lois, but she needs to find out how bad it is! Written by Edmond Hamilton, with art by Wayne Boring and Stan Kaye.

 

The third installment gives us a real gem in “The Ugly Superman!” This story is a real winner for Lois, as she befriends a wrestler that dresses like Superman, but then he falls completely in love with her. He even lays a beating on Clark Kent! Written by Robert Bernstein, art by Kurt Schaffenberger.

 

The Lady and the Lion,” is up next, and this might be the gem of the book. And by gem I mean the highest concentration of insanity. In this one, Superman is duped by Circe into drinking a formula that will turn him into a lion if he doesn’t return and agree to be her mate! Written by Otto Binder, art by Wayne Boring and Stan Kaye.

 

The following story is, “The Superman of the Future!” This story revolves around Superman helping a local scientist test a time machine. The machine of course has interesting side effects, and Superman growing an enormous brain (maybe) are just part of the shenanigans. Written by Otto Binder, with art by Curt Swan and Stan Kaye.

 

The Oldest Man in Metropolis” is the penultimate story in this crazy book. In this story, Superman refers to himself as “an old duffer who can hardly stand up!” We see Clark Kent doing an interview with an acclaimed scientist. The scientist tells Clark that he’s perfected a formula that will extend human life. The doctor tells him that he intends to try it himself before asking for any volunteers. Clark thinks it would be better if he takes it, because it won’t hurt Superman! He takes it and leaves, then the doctor finds the guinea pigs that he tested it on earlier, and they’ve grown old! Story by Robert Bernstein and art by Al Plastino.

 

 

Finally, we get “The Two Faces of Superman!” In this one, Lois has a blind date with a guy, but wants to chase Superman instead, so she makes herself look less than desirable, so the blind date will take her home early. He does, then the date with Superman commences, but he saw her actions with the blind date and teaches her a lesson! Written by Jerry Coleman and art by Kurt Schaffenberger.

 

 

And check out this back cover! Classic Superman for sure!

 

 

 

 

Wonder Woman #226, 1976 & Superman #191, 1966

Image (41)

Image (42)

Today brings a double-shot of DC! Why, you ask? Well, because they’re the only two DC books left that I own from the Bronze and Silver Ages, that’s why! The Wonder Woman book features a duel with Hephaestus! Cover by Ernie Chan & Vince Colletta! Interiors by Martin Pasko (writer), and Jos√© Delbo (art)! The next book is one of my favorite covers, just because of the nonsensical “oath”, that Supes is forced to recite! Cover by George Klein & Curt Swan. Interiors by Jim Shooter (writer) and Al Plastino (art). Enjoy!