Eerie 52, 1973 “Who Will Die?”

Dear cousin Eerie, thanks for all the horror! Especially in this issue, where there are six stories! The Mummy, werewolf, and others scare up some excitement, as Warren magazines brings another issue packed with the scary! And as usual, we get it all started off with a wonderful painted cover by Sanjulian!

The first story gives us a “Ghoulish Encounter,” as The Mummy himself comes face to face with a flesh eating zombie! You see the mummy, snappin’ necks and cashing checks, a zombie chowing down on an unsuspecting dude, and more! Story by Steve Skeates, and art by Jaime Brocal!

Next up, is another tale of the werewolf! “Darkling Revelation” as we see the werewolf meet a fortune teller, and a traveling band of Gypsies. Needless to say that by the time our story ends, the werewolf is doing werewolf things. Writer Al Milgrom, with art by Martin Salvador.

The third installment “Hunter,” is indeed a strange one. We see a a man faced with the harsh reality that a war has devastated the planet, with talk of a demon nearby who knows how this tale will end! Story by Rich Margopoulos, art by Paul Neary.

Beheaded” gives us a haunted house and a headless ghost! A very spooky story that is atmospheric with a deadly ending! Written by John Jacobson, with art by Aldoma.

The penultimate story in this book is called ” The Golden Kris of Hadji Mohammed.” A story about a golden dagger, and the men who will kill to get their hands on it! Written by George Henderson, art by Munes.

Finally, we get another chapter in the story of “Dax the Warrior.”Death rides this night is the name of the story, and it’s no joke, as we see a crew of skeleton warriors on horseback to open the action! Not only that, but Dax is having woman trouble as well, and this kind can’t be settled with some flowers and chocolates! Written and drawn by Esteban Maroto!

A very strong issue, and of course, the back pages are filled with those wonderful ads we all know and love!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creepy 56, 1973 “Summer Special Bonus”

The Warren magazine love continues! In this issue of Creepy, there are some really wild stories! Six stories, to be exact, that will make you absolutely cringe. You’ll see a cat used as a light chain, Satan get arrested (sort of), and a Cthulhu worshiping cult that demands a sacrifice! All of this waits inside with another phenomenal cover by Sanjulian!

Leading off, we have “In My father’s House.” A caretaker at a cemetery makes a grisly discovery, as a corpse is tied to a tombstone! The police investigation starts out slow, but picks up steam when one of the cops comes face to face with the devil! Written by Doug Moench, art by Auraleon!

“Innsmouth Festival” is next, and this one is straight out of the mind of H.P. Lovecraft! As we know, Innsmouth is a familiar setting for his stories, and also for this one as well! A reporter is sent to a small New England town to investigate and interview two ladies that say the town has a secret! It doesn’t take the skeptic long to figure out that they’re on the level! Written by John Jacobson, with art by Adolfo Abellan.

The third story, “Consumed by Ambition,” and this one tells a how a vampire vacations! It not only makes friends, but drinks their blood as well. There will be a finish like no other in this story! Writer, Jack Butterworth, and art by Martin Salvador.

The following story is in full color! yes, that’s right, you get a full color story (whether or not it’s a good thing) about a werewolf by none other than Richard Corben (story and art)! “LycanKlutz,” displays some incredible artwork, but the story is, well…ridiculous.

The Ways of all Flesh” gives another look at a story with a religious backdrop. A woman is murdered along with many others, and the town has lost their faith. In the end, we see that the vicar has his own, special congregation. Story by Doug Moench, with art by Jose Bea.

Lastly, we see “The Bell of Kuang Sai.” An ancient bell, ordered to be built by the powerful leader Kublai Khan! The metal workers from his kingdom are told the greatest bell of all time must be built in his honor. The metal worker tries repeatedly to make one, but it always cracks. He then summons the spirits of the gods, to aid him. The result is not what he had hoped for! Written by George Henderson and art by Munes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eerie 50, 1973 “And the Mummy Walks”

As we close out September, what better way to do this than with a mummy. Starting out a comic with a mummy murdering someone, actually! As we know, Mummies can be fickle, as can werewolves, demons, mad clergymen, aliens and so on. In this special issue of Eerie, you’ll get all of those, plus more, and all started off with an incredible cover by Sanjulian (nice Christopher Lee/Dracula/Hammer homage)!

The first story “The Mind Within” (The Mummy Walks), is a continuing story from previous issues. Mind transference, a funeral, and a mummy wreaking complete havoc! Written by Steve Skeates, art by Jaime Brocal. The story and art are both good, and the mummy especially looks great!

This Evil Must Die” is the next installment (Curse of the Werewolf) in this mag, and hearkens back to the Universal film with Lon Chaney Jr. More so in just the action, but also a bit like the The Wolfman (2010,Benicio del Toro ). A wild chase of the werewolf in the forest leads to a man getting beaten, and nearly killed (they think he’s a sorcerer). Story by Al Milgrom, art by Martin Salvador. Another cool story with artwork to match.

This next one is very interesting. Not only because of the story, but because the name of the story is “Genesis of Depravity” starring Satanna, Daughter of Satan! This book was on the stands less than a month before Marvel comics debuted Satana, the Devil’s Daughter, in Vampire Tales 2. Fascinating bit of information. A woman needs medical help, but the regular methods can’t help. She calls upon the devil himself for help! A story that sounds vaguely familiar, not to unlike Marvel Spotlight 5, with the first appearance of the Ghost Rider! Written by Doug Moench, with art by Ramon Torrents.

A young archaeology student gets more than he bargained for in “Monarch’s Return.” He finds some relics and something alive as well! Story by John Jacobson, and art by Aldoma. A theme that’s been used many times in books, films, and comics, but a good one nonetheless.

Another tale called “Lord’s Wrath” is in this mag, and it involves an awful Baron of a German village, circa 1650. The Baron is cruel and punishes all those that get in his way. But, there is a priest in the village that opposes him, and he’ll go to any length to stop him. Written by John Jacobson and art by Paul Neary. Some good, thought-provoking material in this one.

To keep the action going, we get “The Disciple.” There is some kind of unseen force, and it’s taking over the mind’s of the inhabitants of a city. One man finds out exactly what this thing looks like, and he’s shaken to the bone! Written by Steve Skeates and art by Munes. Interesting story by Skeates, and well worth the read.

Finally, another chapter in the saga of Dax the Warrior called “The Secret of Pursiahz.” Dax is shown something unbelievable by an old wizard. A golden colored man, with the wings of an angel. Story and art by Esteban Maroto! Maroto is quickly becoming one of my favorite horror artists of all time!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creepy 52, 1973 “A Most Private Terror!”

Another week, and we’re getting closer to October! I started the party last week, a little early I know, but from now until the end of October, you’ll see nothing but love for the Warren magazines of the 1970s! In this issue of Creepy, we get six big stories, chocked full of black and white madness!And of course, we get an unbelievable cover by none other than Sanjulian!

The first story (and the best), has perennial Bronze Age storyteller Doug Moench (writer), and horror powerhouse Esteban Maroto (art) bringing the awesome. “A Most Private Terror,” shows a warrior in the Canadian wilderness, as freezing temperatures and his thoughts are making him believe that something is out there, wanting to kill. A bear or maybe a werewolf? Or perhaps something even worse called the “Cold Thing?” Will he die from one of these creatures, the frigid temperatures, or madness?

The second tale involves a futuristic society, but not one that has moved beyond violence. “The Last Hero” doesn’t star Arnold Schwarzenegger or Sly Stallone, but it does show a war between factions, that is more a morality play than a horror story. Still, it’s not bad, and has some value to it. Written by Steve Skeates, and art by Ramon Torrents.

Next up is “Halve Your Cake and Eat it Two.” This one is all about nuclear fallout, and the repercussions. And when I say repercussions, I mean zombies! Story by Doug Moench and art by Adolfo Abellan.

Them Thar Flyin’ Things” is the following story that revolves around two hillbilly cops and alien invaders! Not a lot of action, but an interesting tale nonetheless. Written by Greg Potter, with art by Jose Bea.

In the fifth story, “The Man with the Brain of Gold,” and we see a boy, born with a giant cranium made of gold! In this warped tale we see a sad demise and a tale as old as time. Written by George Henderson and art by Reed Crandall!

Lastly, a story of jealousy and murder abounds, but who committed the murder? Was it the husband who murdered his wife? He can’t remember but it sure looks like he had a motive! Written by Steve Skeates, with art by Felix Mas.

Overall the issue is good but not great. A little too up and down with the stories and artwork. Doug Moench is very solid and Esteban Maroto is such a pro, and throw in EC comics stalwart Reed Crandall, and you get some good material.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EERIE 46, 1972 “The Bloodlust of Dracula Rises Again”

After recently visiting a small show in New Jersey, I came home with twenty new magazines from the Bronze Age! These new mags are the very first I’ve ever read from Warren publishing! It took a long time to get some of these fantastic issues, but it was worth the wait! This first one I’m going to spotlight is a cracker, and it has some incredible artwork inside, and an unbelievable cover by Manuel Sanjulian!

Inside the front cover and back cover, you get a quick look at some of the backstory of Vlad the Impaler, A.K.A. Dracula! Cool little tale with great illustrations. Fred Ott (script) and Aureleon on art.

The first story of the actual issue is “And an Immortal Died” by writer Bill DuBay and artist Tom Sutton! We see the immortal Count Dracula, Vampirella, and more! Twelve pages of Sutton artistic brilliance, along with an interesting story! Definitely the gem of the book!

Next up, we get one of the craziest stories I’ve ever read (“The Things in the Dark“). You see, there is a local ghost story about a certain graveyard, and three boys are about to find out if there is any truth to it! After one of them does find out the hard way, there is an old man that recruits a local psychic investigator to help with the matter. But he might end up as worm food as well! Written by Fred Ott, with art by Jimmy Janes.

The third story is “Garganza,” and cerrtainly the weakest of the book. Basically a Kaiju story without any real substance that doesn’t pull you in. Bill Warren writer, and Paul Neary artwork.

“The Root of Evil” is a story that reminds me of something Amicus studios would’ve put out in the 1970s. A twisted tale about a woman who takes in an alcoholic as a renter. He soon becomes a victim of an insidious scientist. Written by Mike Jennings, with art by Martin Salvador.

The penultimate entry in this book is called “Planet of the Werewolves” and it (ahem) slightly mirrors the movie Planet of the Vampires by Mario Bava.  We look in on a spaceship with scientists that crash-landed on a distant planet that has been beleaguered by Werewolves! Story by Gerry Boudreau, and art by EC comics stalwart, Reed Crandall!

Finally, we get an entry into an ongoing story “Dax the Warrior.” A story with a Conan-esque character, Dax, as he must free his captive mate, and slay the Giant! Story and art by Esteban Maroto!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amazing Adventures 18, 1973 “War of the Worlds!”

You may be wondering why there are back to back days of posts on my blog this week. Well, in short, it’s an anniversary for me (and a few others), and I wanted to send out an extra awesome blog post in celebration. You see, it was ten years ago (Sept. 11, 2009), that my very first column was published (click here). It wasn’t the best, but it was from the heart, as that story is my all time favorite Thor story, and one of my favorites no matter which character or universe we’re talking about. If anyone would’ve told me I’d still be writing about comics ten years later, I’m not sure I would believe it.

Many thanks go out to ComicAttack for giving me my start on this journey. As with everything in life, there are people to thank, and here is my list (if I forget anyone, apologies!)- Andy Liegl, the guy that started ComicAttack.net! I met him and several other great people on the message boards of ComicCollectorlive.com. Gid Freeman (@InfiniteSpeech), was a heavy contributor to the site from day one, and has been one of my favorite people since I met him. Kristin Bomba was a great editor, and put up with my shenanigans for a long time. Imagine if you will, a guy that waits until the night before or even the morning of a column is due to post to submit said article to the editor for proofreading…yeah, I was that guy. She was always very kind and gracious to me, and I’ll never forget it. Another huge influence and help to me was Decapitated Dan Royer (@DecapitatedDan). He was always there for advice, making banners, and encouraging me whenever I needed it. He was also the first guy to get me on a podcast (IIRC). Kudos to those four people, and all the other peeps at CA!

My next stop on the internet was ComicRelated.com (now defunct). My stay there was short, but Chuck Moore and the gang made me feel welcome. Another nod to Decapitated Dan, as he was already writing for them and friends with Chuck. He introduced us at C2E2 in 2013. Later that year, after talking with a couple of friends, I decided to branch out and start my own blog. In all honesty it was the best decision I ever made, as the blog has given me so much freedom and fun times, meeting new people, and getting even more into social media (especially Twitter). And here we are, in 2019. I must also give a shout out to @Charlton_hero and the crew at Super Blog Team Up, as they were a blast to collaborate with this past August. Now, onto this week’s post!

It took a while, but I finally secured a copy of this incredible book! The story-line involving Killraven begins here, (and really gets rolling when Don McGregor begins writing with issue 21) and is not only one of wonder and excitement, but also one that carries many messages within its pages. A concept by Roy Thomas, this story which takes some elements from the H.G. Wells story, and of course, added some other aspects as well.

We see the attack from the aliens, similar to the one in the film (this attack is in 1901), but the aliens return after there first defeat, and they are better prepared this time. The second invasion brings the defeat of mankind, and youths are taken from their homes to be trained for fighting for entertainment purposes. One of these youths is Killraven. He trains and becomes the most lethal killer of all, but never forgets how his mother and brother were callously murdered by a henchman of the aliens, named Dr. Raker.

The talent that went into this book is astonishing. Roy Thomas (plot), Gerry Conway (script), Neal Adams and Howard Chaykin (art), Petra Goldberg (colors), John Costanza (letters), and John Romita Sr. (cover)! As I stated earlier, this book would grow even bigger and better as it went on (McGregor, P. Craig Russell, Gene Colan, etc) with more contributors with excellent creative abilities. Do yourself a favor and grab the issues or the Marvel Masterworks of this title.

 

Superman’s Girlfriend Lois Lane 43, 1963 “Lois Lane – Volunteer Nurse!”

It’s no secret to anyone that reads this blog, that I really love crazy DC Silver Age stories. Well, this one is one of the hammiest stories I’ve read in a while. The stories are basically all imaginary that don’t count towards continuity (even before Crisis came along in the 1980s), but they’re still a lot of fun!

The first story shows a “death of Superman,” but not “the” death…oh wait, that was bogus too. So this story (“The Girl who Mourned for Superman“) isn’t any different than the blockbuster from the speculatory period in the 1990s. Back to 1963, and Lois, as she’s wandering around and sees some kids trying to recreate the Ben Franklin kite and key experiment. After a minute of peer pressure, Lois agrees to help them. Just as a lightning bolt strikes the kite, Superman swoops in to save the day, and to chastise Lois for this “hair-brained stunt.” Then Lois heads into the Daily Planet, and gets an assignment from Perry. As she attempts to leave in the helicopter, the vehicle is sucked up into a plastic sphere, directed by none other than Lex Author himself! It’s all a ruse to get his most hated enemy, Superman, to try and save Lois, and fall into a trap! Script by Leo Dorfman, art by Kurt Schaffenberger (cover by Schaffenberger as well).

The second story, and coincidentally, the one that mirrors the cover image, shows Lois as a volunteer nurse at the local hospital. Perry ends up there after tripping over a ball and chain that Jimmy was using as a prop. A general then enters Perry’s room, to ask him to keep an eye on a soldier that’s in the hospital. Immediately the soldier falls for Lois. But, there is quite a plot twist in this one, that I’ll keep a secret! Writer, Leo Dorfman, art by Kurt Schaffenberger.

Lastly, we get “The Girl Who Deserted Superman!” Yes, I know, a lot of “girls” in these books. In this one, Lana gets hurt water skiing, as she falls off her skis, and somehow falls in the water, floats to the bottom, and hits her head hard enough to get a concussion. Lois and Superman decide they knows better than the doctor, and can snap her out of her coma by whispering to her about some fantasy’s they think she has about Superman. Absolutely ridiculous and absolutely hilarious. Welcome to Silver Age DC comics. Again, Dorfman and Schaffenberger as the creative team.

Check out the last image, as it’s a fantastic advertisement from the back cover of this book! Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

Uncanny Tales 2, 1973 “Out of the Swamp…”

It has been too long since I last blogged about a horror comic! Last week’s awesome post aside (click here for my contribution to Super Blog Team Up), lately I’ve been all over the spectrum on my posts, as in, whatever hits me as worthy at that very moment. Some would say they’re ridiculous and not top tier like certain books that have beloved runs even 40+ years or more later. But I feel like all comics have worth, obviously some more than others, and there’s nothing wrong with liking or not liking any comic. So even when I blog about some lesser known comic, rest assured its got at least some redeeming value. Now, let the horror commence!

This week’s post is solid, and has some really good material from the Golden Age. Some pre-code even! Five stories of madness are inside this one, and solid creators are behind them. The first story (“The Graves that Moved“) starts out in a graveyard as we see caskets popping out of the ground and killing an old guy! Very eerie and sets a good tone for the rest of the book. Art by Jim Mooney (no other credits given).

The second story is called “Out of the Swamps!” This one has a scientist, gangsters, and talking Lemurs…yep. A very bizarre story indeed, but with very good art by Dick Ayers!

Next, we get “Dead End” and we see a man telling the readers that he’s killed himself and doesn’t really exist anymore. It seems like they were going for a real nutty vibe in this one as well, and they achieved that with flying colors. script by Burt Frohman, Art by Tom Gill.

The fourth tale is called “Last Seen Climbing a Ladder!” The story revolves around a scientist that thinks he can build a ladder from Earth to an asteroid. Yes, you read that correctly. He actually succeeds but has plans of his own afterward! Art by Vic Carrabotta.

Last but not least, we get “Superstition.” It shows a penal colony on Guiana, and how the prisoners have escaped. They were helped by some of the natives, but when the prisoners demand to be taken off of the island, things get dicey. You see, the natives have a superstition and don’t want to leave the island. They have a good reason, and the prisoners find out why, but it’s too late! Art by Syd Shores!

All of these stories are kicked off by a cover by none other than Golden Age artist, Carl Burgos (you may have heard of him), but with heavy alterations by John Romita.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marvel Triple Action 17, 1974 (originally Avengers 23, 1965) “Once an Avenger…”

 

Things have been quiet here at Magazines and Monsters, especially on the podcasting front. Well, there is one big reason and I shall reveal it now! I was asked recently to participate in the Super Blog Team-Up event! Some of you may know of this event, and some not, so I shall attempt to educate you on the matter. Simply put, it’s a quarterly event where bloggers (and podcasters) get together to share each other’s love of comics, through blogging about a certain subject (or story line), and share said content throughout the online community. An exercise in building up a community, and as we all know this is needed on social media. On Twitter, you can follow along by searching the hashtag #SBTU or #SuperBlogTeamUp. And these are some of the most interesting and fun blogs you can find anywhere! And needless to say, I feel honored to be among these fine people (links at the bottom to the other blogs/podcasts).

 

Now, on to the main event! The subject this time around is Immortal! For me, being a long time Marvel zealot, there is one character that pops into my brain right away when I hear that word. His name is Kang…or Immortus…or Rama-Tut if you prefer. But why the three names? Because each represents the same character but at different times in history. Kang first appeared in The Avengers 8, 1964, and announced he was from the far flung future, where he discovers the time travel technology of Dr. Doom, and uses it to travel to ancient Egypt, to rule as Rama-Tut (first appearance was in FF 19, 1963). After ruling there for a spell, he encounters the Fantastic Four (they time traveled into the past to find a cure for Alicia’s blindness :D). The FF defeat him and send him packing. In his time travel vehicle, he encounters Doctor Doom, but the two part ways without any shenanigans. Immortus, who first appeared only two issues after Kang in the pages of The Avengers. He wasn’t more than a schemer with time travel abilities initially, but he is the future version of Kang, that grew weary of battle and was eventually entrusted with being a time keeper of sorts by a “higher power” (Avengers Forever, see below).

The next time we see Kang, is in this story! After the bout with the FF, Kang is back in the future (Avengers 23, 1965), and pining for Ravonna (his love interest, and her first appearance). She’s the daughter of a king, whom Kang defeated in the 40th century. Kang let her father live and stay in power only to try and earn her hand in marriage. She rebuffs him constantly, though, and this infuriates Kang. He sees that Captain America has left the Avengers (in the previous issue), and knows this is the time to strike! He easily captures Hawkeye, Quicksilver, and the Scarlet Witch, and places them in “oversized pickle jars,” to quote Hawkeye. The Scarlet Witch uses her Hex power to bust them out, but this is meaningless to Kang, because he can easily defeat these inexperienced heroes (Wanda and Pietro are very young at this point, and Hawkeye is no match for Kang). Before Kang can unleash the final blow, he’s interrupted by none other than Captain America! With Cap back as their leader, the Avengers manage to stop Kang. But, before he’ll accept defeat, he whisks them all away to his future, where his army awaits to destroy them, and the disobedient king and even his daughter!

There was one more piece of info about this story I’d like to quickly mention. When Cap quits the team, he sees an ad for a sparring partner for a boxing champ. Upon arrival, he’s rebuffed by the champ’s tough guy buddies that are apparently screening the candidates? Cap makes quick work of the meatheads after they not only insult him, but try to assault him thinking he’s a wimp. Hilarious on all levels, with classic Stan Lee banter.

Over the years, Kang hasn’t changed very much, and that’s a good thing. His raison d’être (purpose) is always to either conquer or just simply better himself. This can be by killing someone else, enslaving people, or whatever other nefarious scheme he’s plotting. I’d have to say without much hesitation, that Steve Englehart and his Celestial Madonna story from the 1970s is probably the best Kang I’ve read. The Kurt Busiek and Carlos PachecoAvengers Forever” epic and the Roger Stern, John Buscema and Tom PalmerUnder Siege” tale is awesome as well. Look those up for further readings on the Immortal villain, Kang!

Credits in this issue are as follows: Cover by Jack “King” Kirby (pencils), John Romita (inks) and Sam Rosen (letters), “Smilin” Stan Lee (script), “Dashing” Don Heck (pencils), “Jazzy” John Romita (inks), and Artie Simek (letters)!

 

 

Super Blog Team Up!


https://benjaminherman.wordpress.com/author/benjaminherman/

https://charltonhero.wordpress.com/tag/charlton-hero/

http://davescomicheroes.blogspot.com/

https://comicscomicscomics.blog/

https://www.chrisisoninfiniteearths.com/

https://chrisandreggie.podbean.com/

https://betweenthepagesblog.typepad.com/between-the-pages-blog/

http://blackwhitebronzecomics.blogspot.com/

https://theunspokendecade.com/

https://comicreviewsbywalt.wordpress.com/

http://www.dcinthe80s.com/2019/08/sbtu-immortal-forager-second-life-of-bug.html

Pop Culture Retrorama Podcast Ep. 08 – I Am Legend

TDR 459: Super-Blog Team Up: Immortal!

The Flash 227, 1974 “Flash this is your Death!”

Have you ever seen a cover, and thought you had to buy a book even before you looked inside? Well, this comic did that to me, as the incredible work by Nick Cardy drew me in! He’s rapidly moving up on my favorite artists list, and is right up there with my favorite artists for DC comics. His work is always outstanding and on par with anyone.

The story itself is pretty hilarious, and features a villain that we all know and love, well, ok, maybe not all of us love him, but I love Captain Boomerang (created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino in Flash 117, 1960). We see Boomerang going to jail, but then he’s sprung by…his father? That’s right, Boomerang’s father is working on a sadistic scrapbook, that will hopefully showcase Flash’s death!

There is also a backup story involving Green Lantern. We all know Hal Jordan can be quite the imbecile, and this story is no different. We see Hal stomping around like a child, even kicking his lantern at one point. Story by Denny O’Neil, art by Dick Dillin and Dick Giordano.