Weird Science 1, 1990 “Incredible Science-Fiction Stories!”

I love EC comics, and honestly, who doesn’t? These reprints from the 1980s and 1990s are the perfect way to get introduced to these excellent comics from the Golden Age. Of course, EC is mostly known for their horror books, but don’t sleep on their crime, war, or science fiction books! This reprint covers Weird Science 22 and Weird Fantasy 13 (from 1953 and 1950, respectively).

This book has eight stories in it, and each one of them has a legendary creative team behind it. This is not much of a surprise for anyone that knows the quality of material that EC Comics put out, though. Just look at the magnificent cover by Wally Wood

The first story is called “A New Beginning” and it is glorious. It shows a man and a woman that are taking turns using some kind of machine that if not operated correctly, will blow up! A time travel machine, and art by Al Williamson (story by Al Feldstein, colors by Marie Severin, and letters by Jim Wroten) is enough to sell it to me!

The Headhunters” is up next, and we see. doctor that has a machine that can cure insanity! Written by Al Feldstein and art by George Evans, colors by Marie Severin, and letters by Jim Wroten.

Thirdly, “My World” brings dinosaurs, rocket ships, aliens, and everything else your imagination can conjure! Brought to you by Feldstein, Severin, Woten, and Wally Wood (art)!

The following story, “Outcast of the Stars,” is an adaptation of a story by Ray Bradbury! We see a man that owns a junkyard with visions of one day traveling to Mars! Art by Joe Orlando (the rest of the creative team as before)!

Next is “Am I Man or Machine?” This story is about a man that suddenly appears…two years after his death! Script and art by Al Feldstein (colors and letters the same as before).

Only Time Will Tell” is a crazy story that involves a scientist thats on the brink of inventing a device that may doom mankind. A strange visitor warns him that he might want to change his mind. Art by Harry Harrison and Wally Wood!

The next to last story is called “Men of Tomorrow.” Some explorers find a lost civilization only to possibly have it go up in smoke! Art by Jack Kamen!

Trip into the Unknown” is the final tale in this book. The story shows a Professor Oppenheim, as he boards a rocket and heads into the vastness of outer space! What will he and the crew find on another world? Art by Harvey Kurtzman!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Gods 10, 1972 “Earth—The Doomed Dominion”

To close out August, and Jack Kirby Month, I decided to grab a random book from my Kirby box. I think this was the first Fourth World book I bought back a few years ago before I decided to grab trades. I always loved the character of Orion, mostly because of the Justice League animated series. He seems like a B.A. with a good heart, and at times, we do need people like him. No nonsense, get it done kind of people. Sounds a bit like Kirby himself, no? My copy of this book is in less than awesome shape, but it’s complete and the cover is a great action shot (art by Jack Kirby and Mike Royer).

The issue begins with a prelude, as some baddies watch a cocoon like object glowing. They remark that it is the great Mantis himself, and how with him as a leader, how can they fail? Mantis then emerges from the cocoon, and tells his minions to “prepare for the great destiny that awaits them!” We then get a Forager appearance, followed by some ominous words from my personal favorite New God, Orion!

Huge battle scenes, foolish politicians, Lightray, and all the Kirby madness you can handle await inside this comic! Written and pencilled by Jack “King” Kirby, inks and letters by Mike Royer, and colors by Anthony Tollin!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spirit World 1, 1971

If you hadn’t already heard, August has been deemed Jack Kirby Month. Who decided this, you ask? The powers that be, also known as a bunch of hooligans I know on Twitter. So, with this revelation, I decided to jump to some Kirby material for the last two weeks of the blog in August. This magazine is a more recent acquisition of mine, but it was on my radar for a long time. Honestly, pretty much everything Kirby did is on my radar, and rightly so, as the man was a genius. The awesome cover, though, is more Neal Adams than Kirby (layouts), as Neal and the DC braintrust decided to change the cover a bit (according to Mark Evanier, who was employed there at the time, and editor of the book).

The first thriller in this magazine sized book is called “The President Must Die!” This story deals with a person that has a premonition that the President will fall to some trouble on a trip! Written and pencilled by Jack Kirby, inks by Vince Coletta, and letters by John Costanza.

Next up is, “The Calder House!” This is a classic haunted house tale, and the visuals are out of this world! Spirits, monsters, they’re all here! Once again written and pencilled by Jack Kirby, inks by Vince Colletta, and letters by John Costanza.

There’s a three page story, and the photo art style is something to behold. Once again, the King doing something innovative (I’m assuming this is Kirby). “Children of the Flaming Wheel” is cool!

The Screaming Woman” follows, and it is another masterpiece. In this one we see a mysterious woman, reincarnation, and witch burnings! Again, the same creative team of Kirby, Colletta, and Costanza.

The last full story is “Amazing Predictions.” This is one for the ages, as we see historical figures (Nostradamus, Mao, Napoleon, and even Adolph Hitler!), make bold predictions of the future! Again, Kirby, Colletta, and Costanza!

The book ends with a humorous story by the one and only Sergio Aragonés!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strange Adventures 200, 1967 “The Man with the Comet Head!”

For some Strange reason, I felt compelled to return to another crazy sci-fi comic from DC. With a title like this one, who can really argue the validity of its awesomeness? This book has three crazy stories in it, and after reading them, you might just wonder what the heck it was that you just read! Just look at this crazy cover by Carmine Infantino and George Roussos!

The first story (“The Guardian Eye“), stars a character that I don’t know very well, but was a recurring one. The Enchantress, a witch apparently, must face off against a huge, demonic creature! At first, she’s incredibly afraid, but she quickly figures out its secret! Written by Zany Bob Haney, with art by Howard Purcell!

Next up is “The Lair of the Dragonfly!” This reprint from the 1950s (House of Secrets 19, 1959) is all kinds of crazy, but fun as well. I mean, cmon, it’s a fire breathing, giant dragonfly. The science and logic in this one are off the charts in the wild category, but again, fun story. Written by Ed Herron, with art by Bernard Baily.

And finally, “The Man with the Comet Head!” This one is pretty simple. A man at an observatory is watching a meteor, but it suddenly heads right for the telescope and hits it while the man is watching! He emerges with his head in flames. The day is saved by science! Yay! Written by Otto Binder, with art by Jack Sparling!

Again, this is the crazy, fun times you have with these books. Sometimes they have a message to them, other times, just craziness. Get out there and buy some DC sci-fi!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Action Comics 500, 1979 “The Life Story of Superman”

Continuing my look at Superman, this  specific comic is a newer acquisition for me, and one I’ve just finally got around to reading. Not only was I impressed with the artwork, but the story was fun as well. A landmark issue, and a whole lot of fun. Now that’s what an anniversary should be about, right? This book has a fantastic cover by Ross Andru (pencils), Dick Giordano (inks), and Tatjana Wood (colors).

Our story begins with Superman arriving at the ceremony to open up the Superman Pavilion at the Metropolis World’s Fair. All of Superman’s supporting characters are here- Perry White, Jimmy Olsen, Steve Lombard, Lana Lang, and of course, Lois Lane. Mayor Harkness introduces the Man of Steel, and then he cuts the ribbon (a piece of steel he melts with his heat vision), then we’re introduced to the man who owns the pavilion, Robert Arngrim. We can see Superman gets a strange feeling about him.

Once everyone is inside, the memorabilia is receiving oohs and ahhhs from the crowd. Arngrim then asks Superman about his super memory, and he reveals that because of repeated exposure to Kryptonite, he’s having trouble recalling information from his past. Arngrim then points out that the pavilion has his mind prober ray machine, and asks Superman to give a demonstration. He acquiesces, although a bit reluctantly. We then see behind the scenes that there is another man, working in conjunction with Arngrim, to use this device to destroy Superman!

I’m sure ninety nine percent of the people that read my blog know this story and the villains behind this one, but just in case, I’ll leave that out of my post.

This is a really good story by Marty Pasko (writer). He really “gets” Superman and his personality down quite well. The artwork…what can I say other than it’s amazing. Curt Swan (pencils) is my favorite Superman artist of all time. I really enjoy his work with this character, and wish I owned more of it. Frank Chiaramonte (inks) does a fine job adding his touch as well. Adrienne Roy (colors) and Gaspar Saladino (letters) round out the creative team on this must have book!

Superman in the Fifties, 2002 Tpb

It’s no secret that I love Superman. Maybe not every iteration or every era, but I do love the character quite a bit. A big part of that love comes from two sources. First, the Superfriends TV show. I really loved the Man of Steel on the show, as he usually represented a good idea of what Siegel and Shuster tried to relay to readers back in 1938. The second source, and the most important was Christopher Reeve in Superman and Superman II. His moral code and idea that Superman is most importantly a friend to those in need is something he truly believed, and so do I.

This trade paperback really showcases some very fun content of the age, and Superman himself. At this point, Superman had more than a decade of history behind him, a radio show, cartoon (Fleischer), film serial, and a live action tv show (that was new, but a huge hit already). The popularity of the character cannot be understated, and the comic books were great, too!

Just to hit some of the highlights in here, the lead story “Three Supermen from Krypton” from Superman 65, 1950. An interesting tale that tells of three more survivors from the domed planet Krypton. Three evil beings that once challenged Jor-El himself. Written by William Woolfolk, with art by Al Plastino.

Another gem from this collection is “The Ugly Superman,” from Superman’s Girlfriend Lois Lane 8, 1959. Perry assigns Lois to cover the sports beat, and that includes a professional wresting match! Lois compliments him, and he immediately falls for her. Superman/Clark enjoys watching her squirm. Written by Robert Bernstein, art by Kurt Schaffenberger.

You can’t speak about the trade without speaking on Action Comics 252, 1959. Otto Binder and Al Plastino bring us “The Supergirl from Krypton!” Clark sees a missile heading to Earth, and heads out to inspect the crash site. He can’t believe his eyes, as a girl, wearing a similar costume hops out of the missile. She tells him her amazing origin story of how she escape the doomed planet Krypton, and how she came to Earth.

Finally, I present, “The Bride of Bizarro!” Written by Otto Binder, with art by Al Plastino. What if I told you theres a story with Lois, Superman, Bizarro, and…another Superman that’s actually a Bizarro, but looks like the real Superman? We also get a wrecked pirate ship, Bizarro Clark, and Bizarro Lois. It’s one of the funniest comics I’ve ever read.

Do yourself a favor and seek out this trade. I bought it at a discount retailer for $5 (it’s a $20 retail)! An introduction by Mark Waid, cover galleries, and more awesome stories are inside this awesome book!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kid Colt Outlaw 164, 1972 “Flames along the Border!”

In this final installment of the blog for July, I wanted to spotlight another western comic book. Truthfully, as I said last week, westerns aren’t my favorite, but I do think they’ve had good creators on them, that put everything they had into them. The 1950s-1960s was the time of the westerns on television, with shows like Gunsmoke, Rawhide, Bonanza, etc., so it was only natural that comics followed. A very striking cover on this one by Dick Ayers and Frank Giacoia!

There are four stories in this book, and the first one just might be the best! “Draw or Die, Mister!” shows us a true western situation. We get a traveling tough named Splash Spade, and he’s looking to kill someone in a watering hole. But he has one problem, Kid Colt is in this very saloon as well! Written by Stan Lee with art by Jack Keller.

The second story, “Flames Along the Border,” is not only from the cover, but a really cool adventure staring Kid Colt Outlaw! The Kid but stop a group of bandits, but he ends up becoming their prisoner! Writer Joe Gill, art by Jack Keller.

The next one is called “The Iron Giant!” Sorry, no robots here, only one of my favorite things in old comics, a train! A bunch of thieves board the train though, and aim to steal the money on it, but does the train have a mind of its own? Story by (maybe) Stan or Larry Lieber, art by Paul Reinman.

Finally, we get “Trail’s End!” Kid Colt is wounded, and dehydrated so badly he falls off of his horse, but a Native American that he helped once, repays a debt of honor and helps him back to health. Writer Joe Gill, art by Jack Keller!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mighty Marvel Western 6, 1969 “Doom in the Desert!”

I felt compelled to spotlight some Westerns for the month of July, as some Twitter friends have christened it #westerncomicsmonth! Search this hashtag out on Twitter for all the fun. Honestly, they really aren’t my thing, and I only have half a dozen issues or so, but I can’t resist joining in, as these Twitter pals know how to have a good time.

This oversized issue has four big stories, two awesome pinups (I’ll include both at the bottom, both are Kirby pencils, Ayers and Colletta inks, respectively), and cool advertisements! And check out this cool cover by Herb Trimpe!

 

First up is the story from the cover, “Doom in the Desert!” It features the Rawhide Kid, and after he wins a sharp shooting contest, he’s going to give the prize money to a widow, but after he does, he finds himself in the desert and out of water, and at the mercy of some toughs! Story by Stan Lee, art by Jack “King” Kirby and Dick Ayers!

 

Next is “The Saga of Sam Hawk, Manhunter!” Kid Colt is the star of this story, and the Manhunter is out to get him! Betrayal, Native American warriors, and a twist ending you won’t see coming! Story by Stan Lee, art by Jack Keller, and letters by Sam Rosen!

 

Now, for the third star of this book, The Two-Gun Kid, in “Trapped by Ringo’s Raiders!” No, the Beatles aren’t in this one, but we do get a bank robbery attempt, a prison break, and a whole lotta action! Written by Stan Lee, art by Dick Ayers, and letters by Sam Rosen.

 

Lastly, the Rawhide Kid stars in “Shootout with Rock Rorick!” The Kid jumps into a bar fight, but has he finally bitten off more than he can chew messing with the gang of Rock Rorick? Script by Stan Lee, art by Jack Kirby and Dick Ayers, and letters by Artie Simek.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strange Adventures 226, 1970 “Who Will Trigger World War 3?”

After a recent podcast recording (with Jennifer DeRoss, check out my podcast), I was invigorated to cover more DC sci-fi comics! This issue is more of a recent purchase, as the cover (by legendary artist, Joe Kubert) drew me in immediately. Not only the cover art, but the word “Gigantic” at the top was another selling point for sure. Two of the stories spotlight a DC comics perrenial sci-fi favorite, Adam Strange!

 

Speaking of Adam Strange, first up is “The Mechanical Masters of Rann.” An excellent story that is still relevant today, in which upon returning to Rann, Adam finds out that aliens have taken over, but also brought peace. But, peace at a price of certain freedoms. Writer, Gardner Fox, art by Carmine Infantino and Murphy Anderson.

Up next, “Glory Ride to Pluto,” is a feel good story about a pilot on his last voyage, and his son comes along and ends up falling in love. Written by John Broome, with art by Sid Greene.

The Counterfeit Earth” is the third installment in the book. Who knew that the Great Wall of China would one day save the Earth? Story by Otto Binder, with art by Joe Kubert!

The fourth story, “A Letter from the Future,” involves robots, time vortexes, and letters from the year 2157! Story by Sid Gerson, and art by Frank Giacoia.

Next up in this Giant issue, we get “Earth’s Unlucky Day!” A quick little 4 page story about an alien invasion and a twister! Written by John Broome, with art by Seymour Barry.

The following story is the only one that is not a reprint. “The Magic-Maker of Rann,” is referred to as a “picture story.” It’s basically a prose story with spot illustrations. The best part being Adam Strange vs a fire-breathing dragon! Story by Gardner Fox, and art by Murphy Anderson.

Finally, The Atomic Knights bring us “When the Earth Blacked Out!” The premise of this team is absolutely ludicrous, but definitely interesting! A group dedicated to solving mysteries and stopping criminals, in post-apocalyptic…1992. Written by John Broome, art by Murphy Anderson.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction Giant Size Special 1, 1976

Well, it’s finally here. This is the last issue of the series. It has been all sorts of fun going through them, and I hope you all have enjoyed it as well. This issue sports a fantastic cover by Don Newton, then a frontispiece by Rick Bryant, followed by a text piece by Roy Thomas with an illustration by Mike Kaluta!

The first story is “A Martian Odyssey” which is an adaptation of a story by Stanley Weinbaum. He was a science fiction writer that was revolutionary for his time (1930s-1940s). A mission to Mars turns deadly in this story! An awesome story indeed! Script by Don Glut, art by Ruben Yandoc!

Next up is an interview with none other than Theodore Sturgeon (IT!, Killdozer)! A wonderful interview conducted by Alan Brennert.

After that, we get “Journey’s End.” This story is set in the future, and spotlights something called cerebral imagery in the year 2036! Written by Bruce Jones, with art by Alex Niño!

The Forest for the Trees” follows that one, and we get two of my favorite things- laser guns and dinosaurs! Very cool story by Bruce Jones and equally as cool art by Vicente Alcazar!

The beginning of a great installment of Fantastic Worlds by Don and Maggie Thompson discusses some very good anthology recommendations!

Another offering from Bruce Jones (writer and artist) is called “Clete.” The visuals are very “Gorn” from Star Trek, but this one is based on Earth, and an apocalyptic version at that!

Preservation of the Species” is another offering from Bruce Jones, but only the story, with art by Ruben Yandoc (miscredited to Redondo). Another futuristic tale involving mankind, and mutations! This one is interesting to say the least.

After the warning by Roy Thomas in the previous issue, I’m surprised we didn’t get one on this story. “Sinner” by Archie Goodwin (writer/art) takes a pretty good jab at religion in this one.

Speaking of the Gorn/Star Trek, “Arena” adapts a story by Frederic Brown. And, well, it pits a man against a lizard-like creature! Yes, this was the inspiration for the television episode from 1967.

Finally, the story “Threads” closes out the issue and series. Two children using a toy laser gun are playing together. They get called in for dinner. The television tells the viewers there are atmospheric disturbances occurring, and things get darker from there. Written by Mat Warrick, with art by Adrian Gonzales!

If you haven’t figured it out by now, you need these magazines for your sci-fi collection. They’re such an incredible snapshot of the time, and really chocked full of great material.